Shooting beyond reach with the 600mm zoom on Sony RX10 III

Shooting beyond reach with the 600mm zoom on Sony RX10 III

Sony RX10 III is a camera that is unique in its own way. With a 1" sensor and 600mm zoom, I am afraid you won't find another camera that does that at the moment I am writing this. Some compact cameras give you 20x or 30x zoom, but the tiny sensors and crappy lenses in those compact cameras just won't give you anything decent. I had my doubts before purchasing the Sony RX10 III because the stabilization has to be good for a 600mm zoom to provide us with any sharp images. After shooting it for a few weeks in my spare time, I am satisfied with the results I am getting. It helped me to capture subjects that reached beyond, and it wouldn't be possible for me without that 24 - 600mm zoom range.

Red Shouldered Hawk

Many photographers prefer shooting with prime lenses, and they always say, zoom with your feet. I don't disagree with them. As a photographer, I understand it is helpful to move around and to see your subject from different perspectives and different angles. It is always important to fully understand what your camera is capable of, and strive to grow from the limitations. Personally, I have tried and practiced all that, but sometimes certain subjects are beyond reach regardless how far you walk. Even if you can fly, your subject may not let you get close at all. It is true that shooting with a 600mm and doing the extreme close up shots with it can be so much fun that the images I created may lack artistic aesthetic, but sometimes, that's all that matters to me, to have a good time and to enjoy the moment.

The stabilizer in the Sony RX10 III surprised me. Shooting handheld at 600mm, I got more sharp images then I anticipated. Framing and composing is still challenging because your composition can be off with slight movements. You can use the 600mm zoom to perform pseudo macro photography, but be aware that the depth of field is extremely thin and your focus may be off even if you just bump your camera a little. For example, when I was shooting the Anole lizard in my backyard, I first used the wide focus area setting. The camera focus was snappy, but it grabbed onto whatever surface that was easier for the camera system to focus on instead of the particular focus point I wanted, like the lizard's eyes. Since the Anole lizard is alway around in the afternoon, I tried it again the other day. On the second time, I tried using the Lock-on AF to lock focus on the lizard's head, and I am glad to say I was much happier with the result! 

After all, it is springtime and the Sony RX10 III is perfect for me to capture all the lively Texas wildflowers that have been popping up everywhere! Feel free to drop your message in the comments area if you have any questions about this camera.

Traveling helps me grow and thrive

Traveling helps me grow and thrive

Weekly Update: More designs and enjoy shooting with new cameras

Weekly Update: More designs and enjoy shooting with new cameras